Pedi 911: Revlon Perfect Pedicure and Nailene Perfect Toes Stick-On Nails

No time for a pedicure or polish change? No problem!
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Janine
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No time for a pedicure or polish change? No problem!
NailenePerfectToes_FootModel

Stick-on toenails can be an unexpected beauty fix, and a wallet fix, too. Sure, snigger if you want (I know -- Lee Press-on Nails, huh?) but although the idea may amuse, it's true.

Nailene Perfect Toes ($11.49) or Revlon Perfect Pedicure ($12.49) plastic nails look good enough to stand in for the last-minute salon-pedi appointment you can't get before your cousin's wedding this weekend. More importantly, for women who are self-conscious about nails traumatized from a longtime running or marathon habit, they can mean freedom from closed-toe shoes in summer's heat.

One box contains plastic nails in a variety of sizes (Revlon is the better buy with 48 nails to Nailene's 24), and a small tube of adhesive. Some boxes include a package of tiny decal embellishments more appropriate for kids, and a mini emery board for a little shaping once the nails are in place.

A French pedicure style seems most widely available at the moment. I'm not a French-pedi fan (I think they look fake and porn-star). But you can paint your fake toenails with nail polish -- you get a better finish,  you don't need basecoat, and the colour bonds better to the oil-free plastic surface.

My fashion-and-beauty-savvy friend Julia, assistant style editor at Canadian Living, says she loves them. They save her time (she rarely gets to the salon for pro pedis), cash (under $13 vs $45-plus, hello), and apparently last as long as a real polish job. And you can't tell the nails aren't real.

I'm not one to recommend any kind of plastic beauty, but these? Give 'em a test run and let me know what you think.

Revlon Perfect Pedicure and Nailene Perfect Toes are available at most drugstores and mass retailers. Image courtesy of Nailene.